What Have We Heeded About History and the Year of the Metal Rat? According to the Wireless Industry, Absolutely NOTHING!

By Patricia Burke

Are you a Rooster, or a Horse, or a Rat? Or?

When you visit a Chinese restaurant, you can often find a paper menu depicting the 12 animals of the Chinese zodiac.  Diners can determine the animal corresponding with the year of their birth. [1]

The timing of the Chinese New Year celebration was historically recognized as a significant factor in agriculture.

Likewise, experienced farmers recognize that some years are good for growing tomatoes, and some years are washouts.  But because of an extensive early written language and precise, accurate record keeping, the Chinese seers saw patterns represented in the movement of the sun, moon, and Jupiter, reflected in nature, and were able to use this information to guide decision-making about animal breeding, travel, and planting.  This includes the 60-year cycle, of the twelve animals juxtaposed with the 5 elements.

Like the Celtic calendar, with the equinoxes, solstices, and 4 additional cross-quarters of the year, in nature-connected cultures “time” was a science-based measure of environmental phenomenon, and a tool and guidepost.

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What Happened During the Previous Metal Rat Year?

The Great Chinese Famine

To remember what happened the last time the Chinese zodiac corresponded with the same animal and element as the 2020 Chinese New Year, the Metal Rat year, statisticians looked back 60 years. What do we find?

We find the Great Chinese Famine, ostensibly blamed on weather and climate conditions, but in reality, a complete failure of policy.

Hong Kong-based historian Frank Dikötter estimated that, at minimum, 45 million people died from starvation, overwork and state violence during the Great Leap. [2]

NPR’s 2012 story on Yang Jisheng’s book Tombstone reports,

The origins of the famine can be traced to Mao Zedong’s decision, supported by the leadership of China’s communist party, to launch the Great Leap Forward. This mass mobilisation of the country’s huge population was to achieve in just a few years economic advances that took other nations many decades to accomplish. Mao, beholden to Stalinist ideology that stressed the key role of heavy industry, made steel production the centrepiece of this deluded effort. Instead of working in the fields, tens of millions of peasants were ordered to mine local deposits of iron ore and limestone, to cut trees for charcoal, to build simple clay furnaces, and to smelt metal. This frenzied enterprise did not produce steel but mostly lumps of brittle cast iron unfit for even simple tools. Peasants were forced to abandon all private food production, and newly formed agricultural communes planted less land to grain, which at that time was the source of more than 80% of China’s food energy.3

At the same time, fabricated reports of record grain harvests were issued to demonstrate the superiority of communal farming. These gross exaggerations were then used to justify the expropriation of higher shares of grain for cities and the establishment of wasteful communal mess halls serving free meals.4 In reality, grain harvest plummeted and since supply and demand of food before 1958 were almost equal, by the spring of 1959 there was famine in a third of China’s provinces.

As an essentially social catastrophe, the famine showed clear marks of omission, commission, and provision. These three attributes recur in all modern manmade famines. The greatest omission was the failure of China’s rulers to acknowledge the famine and promptly to secure foreign food aid. Study of famines shows how easily they can be ended (or prevented) once the government decides to act—but the Chinese government took nearly three years to act. Taking away all means of private food production (in some places even cooking utensils), forcing peasants into mismanaged communes, and continuing food exports were the worst acts of commission. Preferential supply of food to cities and to the ruling elite was the deliberate act of selective provision.

What Were the Communist Policies That Really Contributed to Such Massive Destruction?

As reported in Wikipedia,

Along with socialist collectivization, the central government decreed several changes in agricultural techniques that would be based on the ideas of Soviet pseudoscientist Trofim Lysenko.[10] One of these theoretic ideas which the Central government would test was close planting, whereby the density of seedlings was at first tripled and then doubled again. The theory was that plants of the same species would not compete with each other. In natural cycles they did fully compete, which actually stunted growth and resulted in lower yields.

Another implemented policy (known as “deep plowing“) was based on the ideas of Lysenko’s colleague Terentiy Maltsev, who encouraged peasants across China to eschew normal plowing depths of 15–20 centimeters and instead plow extremely deeply into the soil (1 to 2 meters). The deep plowing theory stated that the most fertile soil was deep in the earth, and plowing unusually deep would allow extra strong root growth. However, in shallow soil, useless rocks, soil, and sand were driven up instead, burying the fertile topsoil and again severely stunting seedling growth.

Additionally, in the Four Pests Campaign, citizens were called upon to destroy sparrows and other wild birds that ate crop seeds, in order to protect fields. Pest birds were shot down or scared away from landing until dropping in exhaustion. This system failed and resulted in an explosion of the vermin population, especially crop-eating insects, which consequently had no predators.

These radically harmful changes in farming organization coincided with adverse weather patterns, including droughts and floods.

Frank Dikötter argues that most floods were not due to unusual weather, but to massive, poorly planned and poorly executed irrigation works which were part of the Great Leap Forward. [3]

In 1962, Liu Shaoqi, then President of the People’s Republic of China, concluded after 44 days of field research in villages of Hunan that the reasons for the famine were 30% natural disaster and 70% human error.[4]

For Those Paying Attention

  1. Though ostensibly caused by drought and weather conditions, the damage caused by the Great Famine was clearly worsened by government policies. And so it goes with the wireless industry.
  2. The government chose to revolutionize farming, by discarding existing knowledge in favor of new techniques. Many of the theories were flawed and the new agricultural methods caused more harm than good. [5] And so it goes with the wireless industry.
  3. The government suppressed all information about the famine. And so it goes with the wireless industry.

In 2010, Tombstone author Yang Jisheng was interviewed by reporter Louisa Lim. NPR reports:

At the epicenter of the famine, Xinyang in China’s central Henan province, the post office confiscated 1,200 letters sent begging for help. The level of energy expended on covering up what was happening is chilling.

The book is banned in China, where histories blame the famine on natural disasters, the withdrawal of Soviet experts and policy mistakes. Yang says the first two reasons are just excuses that don’t hold any water.

“Our history is all fabricated. It’s been covered up. If a country can’t face its own history, then it has no future,” he says. “And if a regime destroys history systematically, that’s a terrifying regime.”[6]

And so it goes with the wireless industry.

Likewise, the energy being expended to cover up damage being unleashed by unmonitored expansion of wireless technologies, including wireless smart meters and newer 5G infrastructure, is equally chilling.

Our “science” regarding the health and environmental impacts of microwave radio frequencies, including millimeter waves and beam-forming for 5G, is corrupted by industry and its regulators, in partnership with political leadership.[7]

The Power of Local Opposition Saves Lives

Stacy Mosher, the co-translator of the English version of Yang Jisheng’s book Tombstone noted:

“There were certain officials who within their own local parameters were able to save lives because they were able to ignore the central government’s directives. They had the moxie, they had the guts, and they saved lives,” Mosher says. “That is the lesson to take home: A system can be diabolical, it can be lethal, but the individual can make a difference.”[8]

Every official in the United States and elsewhere who has recognized and respected reports of electromagnetic hypersensitivity and other illnesses, harm, and suffering from citizens, associated with tower installations and wireless smart meters, is saving lives.

Those who are not are contributing to the unwise “close planting” in this case, of even more proximal antennas, while “Smart Farming” that ignores the impact of radio frequencies on seeds is a pathological delusion.

If history can teach us anything, the “Race to 5G” paradigm may prove to unleash as much destruction as the Great Leap Forward. If we are completely wrong in our assumption that man-made frequencies are benign, and if we have a similar cycle to the last Metal Rat year, local communities must “ignore the central government’s directives.”

Honor the dead, heal the wounded, stop the rollout. We’re writing the story, now.

SOURCE: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S037842742030028X

Highlights

  • Identifies wide-spectrum of adverse health effects of non-ionizing non-visible radiation
  • Most laboratory experiments were not designed to identify the more severe adverse effects reflective of real-life conditions
  • Many experiments do not include the real-life pulsing and modulation of the carrier signal
  • Vast majority of experiments do not account for synergistic adverse effects of other toxic stimuli with wireless radiation
  • 5G mobile networking technology will affect not only the skin and eyes, but will have adverse systemic effects as well

Notes:

[1] The paper menu at the local Chinese restaurant will list the animals as they correspond to the years. But for those born at the beginning of the Western year,  (starting Jan.1,) the animal correspondence is inaccurate.  This is because the Chinese New Year is sourced from the cycles of nature, and the dates of the Winter Solstice and the subsequent New Moons. To accurately determine the animal for one’s year, it is necessary to look up the date when the Chinese New Year was observed in the year of birth.  For example, in the year we call 2020, the “Year of the Rat” began January 25 or 26.  Some years, the Chinese New Year falls even later in February.  For example, the next celebration will be February 12, 2021.

[2] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Chinese_Famine

[3] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Chinese_Famine

[4]  刘少奇”三分天灾,七分人祸”提法的由来 Archived 14 December 2012 at the Wayback Machine, Selection of the Party History (党史博采), 22 June 2007, Accessed Sept 1, 2018, CPC News. (in Chinese)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Chinese_Famine

[5] For example, ‘close-planting’ (sowing millions of seeds of different species together in a small area) and ‘deep-plough’ (digging the ground much deeper to encourage deep root growth) experiments failed and entire plantings yielded next to nothing.’ For an excellent overview, see: https://alphahistory.com/chineserevolution/great-chinese-famine/

[6] https://www.krcu.org/post/grim-chronicle-chinas-great-famine#stream/0

[7] Captured Agency: How the Federal Communications Commission Is Dominated by the Industries It Presumably Regulates
https://ethics.harvard.edu/files/center-for-ethics/files/capturedagency_alster.pdf

[8] https://www.krcu.org/post/grim-chronicle-chinas-great-famine#stream/0


Patricia Burke works with activists across the country and internationally calling for new biologically-based microwave radio frequency exposure limits. .

Top Image Credit: Farmer’s Almanac

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